Παρασκευή, 4 Ιουνίου 2010

CONFERENCES FOR SUMMER 2010



4–5 June 2010. "Litterature et folklore dans le recit medieval," an international colloquium to be held in Budapest, Hungary. Le Centre Interuniversitaire d'Études Françaises et le Département d'Études Françaises de l'Université ELTE, avec le concours de l'Université Paris III - Sorbonne Nouvelle, se proposent d'organiser un colloque international de Littérature française du Moyen Age, dont le thème sera la reprise et l'adaptation de motifs folkloriques dans le récit médiéval.

La littérature de l'Europe médiévale, savante ou moins savante, religieuse ou laïque, "vaine et plaisante" ou édifiante, entretient des rapports étroits avec le folklore, dont on pourrait dire qu'il l'irrigue profondément. Des personnages surnaturels, fées, géants, monstres divers, mais encore des scénarios d'origine folklorique sont entrés de plein droit ou subrepticement dans le récit littéraire médiéval.

Ce colloque s'intéresse non à élucider les sources folkloriques de tel ou tel texte mais à retracer le cheminement complexe des motifs. Il s'agira d'examiner comment un motif folklorique est repris et adapté dans des contextes littéraires variés. On pourra suivre par exemple le transfert et l'évolution d'un motif d'une culture ou d'une langue à une autre; ou à l'intérieur de la même aire linguistique, l'adaptation d'un même motif folklorique en vers et en prose, d'un siècle à un autre (début du moyen âge/ fin du moyen âge), d'un genre à l'autre (roman/ hagiographie/ épopée...).

UNIVERSITÉ EÖTVÖS LORÁND, CENTRE INTERUNIVERSITAIRE D'ÉTUDES FRANÇAISES, DÉPARTEMENT D'ÉTUDES FRANÇAISES, H-1088 Budapest, Múzeum krt. 4/f., Hungary (+36-1-485-52-74; fax: +36-1-485-52-75; cief@ludens.elte.hu)

4–6 June 2010. "Displaying Word and Image," the International Association of Word and Image Studies (IAWIS/AIERTI) Focus Conference, at the University of Ulster, School of Art and Design, Belfast, U.K. This conference will bring together word and image, as well as literary scholarship, art history and theory, art practice, curatorial practice, museology, and visual culture, in order to address the interrelationship between word & image and display.

Relevant questions will be, e.g., how does the art exhibition function as mediator of literature? Which approaches to Word and Image are specific to curators or museum practitioners? How do Word and Image studies theorize, inform or imply display? We also wish to investigate the use of text/writing in and surrounding exhibitions, and the semiotics of museums' visual identities. How do competencies interact in the tri-disciplinary field between (1) art/art history/theory, (2) museum studies/curatorial practice and (3) literary studies? How are competencies acquired, and how do policies and funding structures enable work in this field?

We seek with this conference to (in)form a network that will investigate literary art exhibitions and work on relevant outputs. A publication on the conference theme is being planned.

Contact: Dr Christa-Maria Lerm Hayes (m.lermhayes@ulster.ac.uk) or Dr Karen Brown (karen.brown@ucd.ie).

5 June 2010. "Imagining Inquisition in Medieval England" to be held at Queen Mary College, London. Inquisitio (‘inquiry’, ‘investigation’) in the later medieval period was one means of investigating crime in general and heresy in particular. Scholarship on medieval inquisition, ranging from Edward Peters’s, Inquisition (1989), to John Arnold’s Inquisition and Power (2001) and Christine Caldwell Ames’s Righteous Persecution (2009), has done much to illuminate its role in continental Europe, not only in combating heresy but also in shaping individuals and communities. However, the place of inquisition in England has not been so clearly established. As has often been noted by historians of the Middle Ages, England occupied a unique position in relation to ecclesiastical developments in medieval Europe, being somewhat outside the immediate influence of Rome and the continent. Our aim is to investigate the role of inquisitio in medieval England and the medieval English imagination, not only by exploring inquisition’s specific legal and pastoral applications, but by examining its more general role as a dialogic mode of inquiry and means of discerning truth. This workshop, which is part of a research project on inquisition and confession in medieval England, is an opportunity to reconsider the standard history and role of inquisitio in medieval England and to explore it not merely as part of a developing ‘Inquisition’ but as part of a broader development in the medieval English consciousness.

Call for papers: We particularly welcome interdisciplinary proposals that address the following questions:

• How do both the historical practice and the constructed idea of inquisition in England differ from those in continental Europe during this period?

• Where are inquisitional discourses located? What are the sources for inquisitional discourse outside of the context of heresy, and in fictional contexts in particular?

• How is inquisition imagined? Can we make claims (as we have for confession) for the role of inquisition in a) creating a sense of self, and b) for generating poetry in later medieval England? What impact do legal and pastoral developments have on fictional inquisition and on literary activity?

• How is the relationship between inquisition and truth imagined in medieval English literature, law, and pastoralia?

• What is the extent of the role of inquisition in legal and pastoral contexts in medieval England? What are its goals? How do they differ from and/or collapse into those of confession?

• Are there medieval roots to the post-medieval concept of "The Inquisition"? To what extent does this concept differ (if at all) from medieval discourses and ideas concerning inquisition?

Proposals for papers should be sent to Mary Flannery (m.flannery@qmul.ac.uk) or Katie Walter (katie.walter@rub.de) by 15 January 2010.

8 June 2010. "Late Medieval Episcopal Humanism," in the Queen Mary Seminar series, at Queen Mary College, London.

Professor Andrew Cole (Princeton), will talk on 'Acting on Advice: Scenes of Episcopal Humanism in the work of Thomas Chaundler'. Andrew Cole is the author of Literature and Heresy in the Age of Chaucer and the forthcoming From Modern to Medieval: Hegel, the Dialectic and Other Stories. He also co-edited the forthcoming book The Legitimacy of the Middle Ages: On the Unwritten History of Theory and is co-editor of The Yearbook of Langland Studies. He is spending spring 2010 at All Souls in Oxford.

There will be responses from Dr Warren Boutcher (QM), Professor Virginia Davis (QM), and Dr Daniel Wakelin (Cambridge), as a prelude to further questions and discussion. The seminar will be followed by a wine reception.

Queen Mary contacts: Professor Miri Rubin, History (m.e.rubin@qmul.ac.uk) Professor Julia Boffey, English (j.boffey@qmul.ac.uk)

10–12 June 2010. "Studium Conference: Sacred Space, Sacred Memory: Bishop-Saints and their Cities," an international conference to be held in Tours, France. The keynote speaker will be Maureen Miller (Univ. of California Berkeley).

The history of many European cities was shaped by one or more saintly figures whose ties to the city—real or imagined—had both spiritual and tangible consequences. The topography of the city, its economy, its institutions, its liturgy, its reputation, and even its inhabitants’ sense of civic pride, could all be shaped by and were dependent upon an idiosyncratic understanding of the saint’s association with the city. The figure of the bishop-saint, moreover, bestowed with extraordinary spiritual and temporal prerogatives, represents a distinctive type which this conference seeks to address. What was his impact on religious, political, and cultural practices and institutions in a given city? What are some of the privileges associated with promoting his cult? In what ways do local claims on the bishop-saint evince tensions on a regional/national level or between elites and the masses? Possible perspectives on these and other related issues may include, but are not restricted to, liturgy, music, hagiography, art history, theology, history, and paleography.

Call for papers: The conference organizers are soliciting abstracts for individual papers and proposals for complete sessions for its 2010 Conference, and are inviting scholars from a wide variety of disciplines to offer their perspectives on issues coinciding with the Conference’s theme. Ideally, papers will deal with different parts of Europe and address periods ranging from the Middle Ages to the present. Abstracts in French or English of 300 words or less for a 20-minute paper should be e-mailed no later than 30 January, 2010. Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fee (reduced for students and post-docs). Contact: Christine Bousquet (Christine.bousquet@univ-tours.fr) or Yossi Maurey (ymaurey@mscc.huji.ac.il).

10–13 June 2010. "Mapping Late Medieval Lives of Christ," at Queen's University, in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The culmination of the AHRC-funded "Geographies of Orthodoxy" project, the "Mapping Late Medieval Lives of Christ" conference hosts leading international scholars who will be exploring all aspects of late medieval Christological piety, with a particular emphasis on the cultural manifestations of the pseudo-Bonaventuran tradition, in a variety of European contexts. Registration for the conference is now open and a draft programme is online (http://www.qub.ac.uk/geographies-of-orthodoxy/discuss/conference-mapping-late-medieval-lives-of-christ/).

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16–17 June 2010. "The Digital Middle Ages: Teaching And Research," the Third International MARGOT Conference (Moyen Age et Renaissance Groupe de recherches - Ordinateurs et Textes), will be held at Barnard College, Columbia University New York. This conference is co-sponsored by the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Plenary speakers: David Trotter (Aberystwyth University, Wales) and John Unsworth (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) For full program information and registration see the conference website (http://margot.uwaterloo.ca/DMAConference/index.html).

18–19 June 2010. "Rethinking Medieval Liturgy: New Approaches across Disciplines," in London. The workshop will take place in London at the Lock-keepers Cottage, Queen Mary, University of London, E1 4NS.

The study of medieval liturgy has undergone a remarkable transformation in recent years. As the lines between various kinds of cultural studies have become increasingly blurred, musicologists, art historians, literary scholars, and historians have realised its centrality and importance. Liturgy provides fundamental insights into the experience of worship and devotion in the middle ages, as the medium through which religious ideas were transmitted. There is now a need, we believe, to find coherent expression and a voice for the emerging generation of students of the liturgy, by breaking institutional and disciplinary boundaries, and by bringing so-called para-liturgical genres, such as drama, hagiography, and sermons, as well as art and architecture, back into their liturgical contexts.

To this purpose, we are holding a two-day international workshop for post-graduate students from a variety of disciplines on the subject of medieval liturgy. It will include a training session in recent developments of liturgical studies, led by acclaimed professor Susan Boynton of the Department of Music at Columbia University.

Call for papers: Proposals are invited from researchers who are engaged in or have recently finished their post-graduate studies. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Theories of ritual and their application to medieval liturgy

- Musicology and music history

- Art and architecture as related to liturgy

- Worship and devotion as cultural phenomena

- Liturgy in the history of religious institutions

- Christianization and reform

- Liturgy and material culture - The social role of liturgy

- Hagiography, sermons and drama in their liturgical contexts

- Manuscripts and the representation of liturgical texts

Papers will be 20 min. in length. Individual paper proposals (papers and proposals should be in English) to a maximum of 300 words should be sent by 1 March 2010 to: Kati Ihnat, Queen Mary, University of London (kati_ihnat@yahoo.ca) or Erik Niblaeus, Kings College London (erik.niblaeus@kcl.ac.uk).

18–19 June 2010. "Studies in Cotton Nero A X (the Gawain-Manuscript)," the 10th Annual Summer Conference organized by LOMERS (London Old and Middle English Research Seminar).

Speakers will include Alcuin Blamires, Helen Cooper, Tony Davenport, Rosalind Field, Susanna Fein, Julian Harrison, Derek Pearsall, Ad Putter

Call for papers: Proposals are invited for 20 minute papers on relevant topics such as: Workshop, Palaeography; Codicology; Patronage; Reception; History and Context; Texts; Illustrations; Authorship(s); Literary Contexts; Textual Editing . . . Please send abstracts of no more than 200 words by the end of February to Ruth Kennedy (r.kennedy@rhul.ac.uk).

Proceedings will be edited by Ruth Kennedy and Simon Meecham-Jones. For previous proceedings see: http://us.macmillan.com/author/ruthkennedy.

18–19 June 2010. "Rethinking Medieval Liturgy: New Approaches across Disciplines," in London. The workshop will take place in London at the Lock-keepers Cottage, Queen Mary, University of London, E1 4NS, from Friday June 18 (10am) to Saturday June 19 (5pm) 2010. Application for AHRC funding pending.

The study of medieval liturgy has undergone a remarkable transformation in recent years. As the lines between various kinds of cultural studies have become increasingly blurred, musicologists, art historians, literary scholars, and historians have realised its centrality and importance. Liturgy provides fundamental insights into the experience of worship and devotion in the middle ages, as the medium through which religious ideas were transmitted. There is now a need, we believe, to find coherent expression and a voice for the emerging generation of students of the liturgy, by breaking institutional and disciplinary boundaries, and by bringing so-called para-liturgical genres, such as drama, hagiography, and sermons, as well as art and architecture, back into their liturgical contexts.

To this purpose, we are holding a two-day international workshop for post-graduate students from a variety of disciplines on the subject of medieval liturgy. It will include a training session in recent developments of liturgical studies, led by acclaimed professor Susan Boynton of the Department of Music at Columbia University. Call for papers: Proposals are invited from researchers who are engaged in or have recently finished their post-graduate studies.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Theories of ritual and their application to medieval liturgy

- Musicology and music history - Art and architecture as related to liturgy

- Worship and devotion as cultural phenomena

- Liturgy in the history of religious institutions

- Christianization and reform

- Liturgy and material culture

- The social role of liturgy

- Hagiography, sermons and drama in their liturgical contexts

- Manuscripts and the representation of liturgical texts

Papers will be 20 min. in length. Individual paper proposals (papers and proposals should be in English) to a maximum of 300 words should be sent by 1 March, 2010 to: Kati Ihnat, Queen Mary, University of London (kati_ihnat@yahoo.ca) or Erik Niblaeus, Kings College London (erik.niblaeus@kcl.ac.uk).

23–27 June 2010. "Perceptions of Place: English place-name study and regional variety," an international conference to be held in association with the English Place-Name Society at the Institute for Name-Studies, University of Nottingham, in England.

Speakers include:

• Professor Thomas Clancy (Glasgow) on English place-names in the Scottish border region

• Professor Richard Coates (UWE) on place-names and linguistics

• Professor Klaus Dietz (Freie Universität Berlin) on place-names and English historical dialectology

• Professor Gillian Fellows-Jensen (Copenhagen) on the Scandinavian background to English place-names

• Professor Carole Hough (Glasgow) on women in English place-names

• Professor John Insley (Heidelberg) on personal names in place-names

• Dr Kay Muir (Northern Ireland Place-Name Project) on English place-names in Ireland

• Dr Oliver Padel (EPNS president) on the Celtic element in English place-names

• Dr Matthew Townend (York) on the Scandinavian element in English place-names

Contact: Perceptions of Place, Institute for Name-Studies, School of English, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (rebecca.peck@nottingham.ac.uk). Further details on arrangements and costs will be available on the conference website (http://ww.nottingham.ac.uk/english/ins/).

24–26 June 2010. "Translatio," the 7th Annual Symposium of the International Medieval Society, Paris (IMS), in collaboration with the Laboratoire de médiévistique occidentale de Paris (LAMOP).

Keynote speakers: Rita Copeland, University of Pennsylvania, and Serge Lusignan, Université de Montréal & LAMOP.

The medieval term translatio brings into contact linguistic, material, and cultural fields. It was attached to a group of related concepts: the physical displacement of objects, the rewriting of a text in a new language, or the transfer of meaning proper to metaphor. Eventually, writers of the Latin West began to employ the concepts of translatio studii et imperii in an attempt to define their conflicted relationship with the authority and learning of Classical, Muslim, and Byzantine cultures; the term thus expressed their understanding of cultural contact and exchange. Recent work has shown how these various iterations of translatio can indicate complex acts of cultural negotiation or appropriation, which repositioneded the opposing forces of old and new, the other and the self.

The present symposium will bring together scholars from diverse disciplines, in order to study the various modes and meanings of translatio. Papers might address such topics as: the adaptation of texts from one language into another in literary or musical sources; the transfer of themes from one medium to another (among, for example, texts, music, painting, sculpture, or textiles); the use of spolia in building or orfèvrerie; the translation of relics; the exploitation of Classical themes or narratives by medieval political figures or historiographers; the controversies over Biblical translation; the function of translatio as metaphor in religious or secular writing; the appropriation of words from one language into another.

Call for papers: The International Medieval Society of Paris (IMS-Paris) is soliciting abstracts for individual papers and proposals for complete sessions for its 2010 Symposium, which will explore the practice and function of translatio in medieval France. The International Medieval Society of Paris (IMS-Paris) is soliciting abstracts for individual papers and proposals for complete sessions for its 2010 Symposium, which will explore the practice and function of translatio in medieval France. Papers should address France, Francia, or post-Roman Gaul in some way, but they need not be exclusively limited to this geographic area.

We encourage submissions from a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to: Anthropology * Archaeology * Art History * Classical Studies * Comparative Literature * Gender Studies * History * History of Medicine * History of Science * Linguistics * Literary Studies * Musicology * Philosophy * Religious Studies * Theology * Urban Studies. Abstracts of no more than 300 words for a 20-minute paper should be e-mailed to contact@ims-paris.org no later than 1 February 2010. In addition to the abstract, please submit full contact information, a CV, and a tentative assessment of any audiovisual equipment required for your presentation.

The IMS will review submissions and respond via e-mail by 15 February 2010. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS website. Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fee (35 euros, reduced for students). The registration fee will be waived for IMS members. The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary and bilingual (French/English) organization founded to serve as a center for medievalists who research, work, study, or travel to France. For more information about the IMS and the schedule of last year’s Symposium, please see our website: www.ims-paris.org.

28–30 June 2010. "Orthodox Constructions of the West," a conference hosted by the Christian Orthodox Studies program at Fordham University, and co-sponsored by the Center for Medieval Studies, at the Rose Hill campus. Contact George Demacopoulos (demacopoulos@fordham.edu) or Aristotle Papanilolaou (papanilolaou@fordham.edu).

8–10 July 2010, "Central Asian Islamic Manuscripts and Manuscript Collections," the Sixth Islamic Manuscript Conference, organized by the Islamic Manuscript Association, will be held at Queens' College, University of Cambridge, England. The Conference will be hosted by the Thesaurus Islamicus Foundation, the Cambridge Central Asia Forum, and the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Centre of Islamic Studies, University of Cambridge.

Call for papers: The Association invites the submission of abstracts on topics related to the study of Islamic manuscripts—particularly codicology—and the care and management of Islamic manuscript collections. Preference will be shown to submissions pertaining to the Conference's theme. The Conference will be organised around the Association's four key working areas: cataloguing, conservation, digitisation, and research and publishing; and papers falling into these broad categories will be included in the relevant panel. The Association will also consider submissions on topics that do not fall directly under the purviews of the working groups but are yet concerned with scholarship on Islamic manuscripts or the care and management of Islamic manuscript collections. Please note that the total number of papers accepted will not exceed 25 and that preference will be given to speakers who have not presented papers at the Association's previous conferences.

The invitation is open to members and non-members of the Association. The languages of the Conference will be Arabic and English and submissions will be accepted in both languages. The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2010. Late submissions will not be considered. The duration of each conference paper is 30 minutes inclusive of 10 minutes of questions and answers.

Please send an abstract of 500 words, a resume, and the cover sheet (available at http://www.islamicmanuscript.org/conferences/2010conference/CallForPapers.html) to the Association's Executive Committee: The Islamic Manuscript Association Ltd, c/o 33 Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1QY, United Kingdom (fax: +44 (0)1223 302 218; ima@islamicmanuscript.org; http://www.islamicmanuscript.org/conferences/2010conference/SixthIslamicManuscriptConference.htm).

12–14 July, 2010. "Form and Function in the Late Medieval Bible," a conference hosted by the Centre for the History of the Book, at the University of Edinburgh, in Edinburgh, Scotland.

At the beginning of the thirteenth century a new type of Bible emerged from Paris and southern England and spread rapidly throughout Western Europe. Innovations in script and parchment enabled the creation of single-volume Bibles, some of which could easily fit a modern pocket; other features, such as the modern chapter division, introduced unprecedented ease of usage. These Bibles became the template for Gutenberg's celebrated 42-line version and have had an influence on printed Bibles ever since. Today, hundreds of these manuscripts survive, bearing witness to one of the most popular books of the Middle Ages. The ubiquity of these Bibles has only recently been met by scholarly interest, and questions remain regarding their evolution as well as their place within the medieval university, pulpit and priory.

The conference will bring together experts in medieval liturgy and sermons, art, religion and manuscripts, to examine the material culture of the Late Medieval Bible and its setting. Presentations, discussions and two workshops would draw on the wealth of manuscripts in the University Library and the NLS in analysing variants of text and layout, imagery and addenda. Speakers will include: • Nicole Bériou (Université Lumière Lyon 2) • Laura Light (Independent Scholar, Boston) • John Lowden (Courtauld Institute of Art, London) • Eyal Poleg (CHB, University of Edinburgh) • Diane J. Reilly (Indiana University, Bloomington) • Paul Saenger (The Newberry Library, Chicago) • Paul Antonio (Calligrapher, London).

Call for papers: Papers are invited on any aspect of the late medieval Bible (c.1230–c.1450) and its place within medieval religion, culture and society; sessions will address the evolution of the late medieval Bible, its layout, addenda and art, as well as its connection to exegesis, preaching and liturgy. Proposals (up to 300 words) should be e-mailed to L.M.B@ed.ac.uk or sent to the Centre for the History of the Book, 22a Buccleuch Place, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9LN, Scotland, by December 20.

A small number of postgraduate bursaries will be made available towards defraying costs of travel and registration. The date of the conference is planned to enable attendees to take part in the CHB's Material Cultures 2010 conference, 16–18 July.

12–15 July 2010. The 17th International Medieval Congress (IMC) will be held at Leeds, England. Contact: International Medieval Congress Administration, Institute for Medieval Studies, Parkinson Bldg. 1.03, Univ. of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, U.K. (+44-113-343-3614; fax: +44-113-343-3616; imc@leeds.ac.uk; http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc).

15–19 July 2010. The Seventeenth Biennial Congress of the New Chaucer Society will take place in Siena, Italy, in 2010. In keeping with the suggestions made at the 2003 Glasgow Congress, there is no single theme for the Congress. The overall structure reflects areas of inquiry that emerged from members' initial proposals for sessions. Sessions will consequently follow several threads: Chaucerian Temporalities; Medievalisms; Found in Translation: Italy and England in the Age of Chaucer; Transnationalism; Insular Multilingualisms; Political Languages; Visual Cultures; Religious Practice, Institutions, and Theology: Chaucerian Contexts; Bodies; Animal Discourses; Philosophy and Science; and Manuscripts and Printed Books. In addition, there will be a number of non-aligned panels and sessions, and several plenary sessions.

Call for papers: paper sessions will comprise three or four fifteen-minute papers. At least one paper will be given by a graduate student or research student. Panel sessions will comprise seven or eight five-minute presentations. For both paper and panel sessions, organizers will enforce time limits to allow for discussion.

The NCS Constitution requires that Congress participants (except for invited speakers from other fields) be members with their dues paid. We encourage you to share information about the Congress with other interested people who may not be NCS members at present—graduate students, new colleagues, and others working outside the field who may find sessions related to their specialisms. (Graduate students and research students may join NCS at a reduced membership rate.) Finally, a tight limit has been set on prior invitations to participate in any session. The overwhelming majority of participants in the Congress will be those who respond to this call.

NCS members who wish to give papers or participate in panels at the Congress should send a one-paragraph abstract to the organizer(s), to arrive before 15 July 2009, preferably at the e-mail addresses given below in the session description. Please indicate any specific audio-visual needs. Session organizers will select papers and panels soon afterwards, in consultation with the Program Chairs. The Program Committee will form additional sessions as interests arise. Names of Congress participants will be announced in an upcoming Chaucer Newsletter. Members may apply to participate in more than one session, but they may finally take part in only one.

The program committee is composed of Thomas Hahn (Chair), Marion Turner, David Wallace, Jessica Brantley, Orietta Da Rold, and Stefania D'Agata D'Ottavi (Chair of the Local Arrangements Committee) with Richard Firth Green (NCS President) and David Lawton (NCS Executive Director) ex officio. For more information, visit the NCS website (http://artsci.wustl.edu/~chaucer/congress/congress2010call.php).

17–19 July 2010. "Authority and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Chronicles," the second biennial Cambridge International Chronicles Symposium (CICS) will be held at the University of Cambridge. The new symposium will comprise keynote addresses, panel discussions, a tour of Cambridge College Libraries, formal conference dinner, publications fair and wine reception. Refreshments and lunches are provided for conference guests and college accommodation is available. As on the previous occasion, a limited number of small bursaries will be awarded.

Call for papers: the organizers are accepting proposals from scholars in the disciplines including but not limited to English, History, Literature, Philosophy, and Religious Studies. Topics for discussion could include:

-Kingship and queenship, earls and ealdormen;

-Abbots and abbesses, monks and nuns;

- Ecclesiastical and secular authorities;

- Institutional authority;

- National authority and identity;

- Masculine, feminine, and neuter: linguistic authority;

- Auctors and Auctoritas;

- Textual authority, witnesses, and scribal traditions;

- Kinglists and genealogies;

- Nuns in the scriptorium;

- Female voices, male scribes—authority and authorship;

-Gender and legal practices;

- Moral authority;

- Ritual and authority;

Establishment of authority: feuds, force, and warfare;

- The construction of gender in chronicles.

Abstract (of approximately 250 words) are due no later than 15 December 2009. In special cases, papers will be commissioned for publication without presentation at the conference (contact the organisers for more information). Please check the website for regular updates (CambridgeICS@gmail.com; http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/diary/cics/index.html).

19–23 July 2010. "1212–1214: El trienio que hizo a Europa." XXXVII Semana de Estudios Medievales de Estella, at the Palacio de los Reyes de Navarra, in Estella, Spain.

Speakers will be

* Prof. Dr. D. William Chester Jordan University of Princeton

* Prof. Dr. D. Jacques Verger Université de Paris-Sorbonne

* Prof. Dra. Dña. Maria Ginatempo Università degli Studi di Siena

* Prof. Dr. D. Laurent Macé Université de Toulouse

* Prof. Dr. D. José Manuel Nieto Soria Universidad Complutense de Madrid

* Prof. Dr. D. Francisco García Fitz Universidad de Extremadura

* Prof. Dra. Dña. María Joao Branco Universidade Aberta de Lisboa

* Prof. Dr. D. Martín Alvira Cabrer Universidad Complutense de Madrid

* Prof. Dr. D. Pascual Martínez Sopena Universidad de Valladolid

* Prof. Dr. D. Agostino Paravicini Bagliani Università della Svizzera italiana. Lugano

* Prof. Dr. D. Nicholas Vincent University of East Anglia

* Prof. Dra. Dña. Eloísa Ramírez Vaquero Universidad Pública de Navarra

* Prof. Dra. Dña. Monique Bourin Université de Nantes

* Prof. Dr. D. Luigi Provero Università di Torino

Contact: +848-424-681/86; athrebas@cfnavarra.es; mperezom@navarra.es; http://www.cfnavarra.es/medieval/

19–24 July 2010. The 13th Colloquium of SITM (Société internationale pour l'étude du théâtre médiéval) will meet in Giessen, Germany. Papers will be in English, French, or German. Contact: Prof. Dr. Cora Dietl, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Institut für Germanistik, Otto-Behaghel-Straße 10 B, 35394 Gießen, Germany (http://www.uni-giessen.de/~g91159/sitm.htm).

21–24 August 2010. "Music for the Office and Its Sources in the Low Countries (1050–1550)," an international conference in Antwerp, Belgium. The conference, supported by the International Musicological Society Study Group "Cantus Planus", will take place during the yearly festival Laus Polyphoniae (Flanders Festival Antwerp), and in close collaboration with the festival program.

The office is the most substantial portion of the liturgy: in all types of communities and services, whether of monastic, cathedral, or courtly signature, it formed a crucial part of their musical culture. Because the Low Countries knew an unprecedented variety of communities and institutions, the contexts in which the office was celebrated in the region were equally varied. Indeed, the wealth of sources for the office from the Low Countries has led many scholars to study selected aspects of the celebration of the office in the region, such as prose or versified historiae, tropes and prosulas, motets composed for Vespers and Salve services, and 'paraliturgical' pieces. The conference sets out to explore the variety of the extant repertory and its sources, by bringing together new research into the music for the office in, or related to, the Low Countries (understood to include Northern France and the Meuse-Rhineland), and studying plainchant as well as polyphony and their interrelations.

Call for papers: Scholars and performers studying chant and/or polyphony from analytical, historical, liturgical, or interdisciplinary perspectives are invited to send proposals of no longer than 350 words to Pieter Mannaerts (pieter.mannaerts@arts.kuleuven.be) before 15 February 2010. Notification of acceptance will be given by 15 March 2010. The final conference program will be published around 1 April 2010, on the website of the Alamire Foundation (http://www.arts.kuleuven.be/alamire). A selection of conference papers will be published in the internationally peer-reviewed Journal of the Alamire Foundation in 2012.

23–27 July 2010. "In Principio Fuit Interpres," the international Cardiff Conference on the Theory and Practice of Translation in the Middle Ages, at the Università degli Studi di Padova, in Padua, Italy.

Linguistic and literary traditions include translation in their myth of origin–thus the linguistic and scholar Gianfranco Folena proposed to substitute the motto In principio fuit poëta with the humbler In principio fuit interpres. Following his suggestion, we welcome papers addressing translation in the Middle Ages, marking the relationship between classical, Middle Eastern, and vernacular languages, and studying translation as the representation of ideas and texts in different media.

Plenary speakers: Roger Ellis, Domenico Pezzini, David Wallace.

Contact: Alessandra Petrina and Monica Santini, Dipartimento di Lingue e Lett. Anglo-Germaniche e Slave, Via Beato Pellegrino, 26, 35100 Padua, Italy (or to both: alessandra.petrina@unipd.it and monica.santini@unipd.it).

25–30 July 2010. The Thirteenth Triennial Congress of the International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS) will take place in Montreal, Canada. The Congress's overarching theme is "Courtly Cultures on the Move," and speakers are especially invited to consider the theme in relation to three areas:

transmission and reception of courtliness;

books and courtly culture; and

languages of courtliness.

The organizers also welcome proposals for thematic sessions organized by individuals or groups.

Call for papers: Please submit a title and a 250-word abstract by 15 December 2009 to the program committee (icls2010@listes.umontreal.ca). Papers may be given in any of the official languages of the ICLS: French, English, or German. All speakers must be members of the ICLS and should indicate their branch affiliation in their abstract. Anyone not yet a member should contact the secretary of the appropriate national branch to join. For more information, see the conference website (http://www.icls2010.ca/en/home.html).

17–19 August 2010. "New techniques for old documents: Scientific examination methods in the service of preservation and book history." The IFLA Preservation and Conservation Section and The Rare Books and Manuscripts section invite speakers to present papers for a satellite meeting in conjunction to the IFLA World Library and Information Conference 2010. The satellite conference takes place at Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Within this theme we welcome papers on scientific techniques such as DNA, infrared spectroscopy, imaging techniques and micro x-ray fluorescence. All these techniques may be used in conservation treatments and material bibliographic issues such as the determination of animals for leathers, provenance through DNA-analysis, measuring paper strength, examination of pigments and inks for palimpsests and other documents, and ICR - (Intelligent Character recognition) for the recognition of hand-written text. We would like to encourage a multi-disciplinary meeting and therefore, relevant papers from both scientists, conservators, book-historians and others who may add interesting and new knowledge within the overall topic, are welcome to submit abstracts for a paper.

The conference will be a two-day meeting, including social events. Visits are planned for August 19. Please note that speakers will have to cover their own expenses for travel and accommodation. However, IFLA satellite conferences normally attract a worldwide audience with many opportunities for discussions and interesting meetings.

Call for papers: Please send an abstract of no more than 350 words by e-mail only, to Per Culhed (Per.Cullhed@ub.uu.se) and Raphaele Mouren (Raphaele.Mouren@enssib.fr) before 1 March 2010. The submissions will be examined during March and prospective speakers will be notified on 6 April. The abstract should include the following: name of the speaker, institutional affiliation and address, title of the paper, and short biography.

21–24 August 2010. "Music for the Office and Its Sources in the Low Countries (1050–1550)," At the Conference Center Elzenveld, Antwerp, Belgium.

The office is the most substantial portion of the liturgy, and has incited medieval and Renaissance composers to contribute to its musical splendour for at least half a millennium. In all types of communities and services, whether of monastic, cathedral, or courtly signature, the office formed a crucial part of their musical culture. Because the Low Countries knew an unprecedented variety of communities and institutions, the contexts in which the office was celebrated in the region were equally varied. Indeed, the wealth of sources for the office from the Low Countries has led many scholars to study selected aspects of the celebration of the office in the region, such as prose or versified historiae, tropes and prosulas, motets composed for Vespers and Salve services, and 'paraliturgical' pieces.

This conference sets out to explore the variety of the extant repertory and its sources, by bringing together new research into the music for the office in, or related to, the Low Countries (understood to include Northern France and the Meuse-Rhineland), and studying plainchant as well as polyphony and their interrelations.

Scholars and performers studying chant and/or polyphony from analytical, historical, liturgical, or interdisciplinary perspectives are invited to send proposals of no longer than 350 words to before 15 February 2010. Notification of acceptance will be given by 15 March 2010. The final conference program will be published around 1 April 2010, on the website of the Alamire Foundation (www.arts.kuleuven.be/alamire). The program committee is currently being composed, and will be announced within the coming weeks.

All International Musicological Society languages may be used (English, French, German, Italian, Spanish); the principal conference language will be English.

The conference, supported by the International Musicological Society Study Group "Cantus Planus," will take place during the yearly festival Laus Polyphoniae (Flanders Festival Antwerp), and in close collaboration with the festival program. Participants will have a unique opportunity of hearing concerts related to the conference theme, which will thus include both chant and polyphony from Low Countries sources. A selection of conference papers will be published in the internationally peer-reviewed Journal of the Alamire Foundation in 2012 (www.arts.kuleuven.be/alamire).