Παρασκευή, 8 Ιανουαρίου 2010

Female Saints and Sanctity in the Protestant Tradition

Female Saints and Sanctity in the Protestant Tradition



American Society of Church History 11
Society for Reformation Research 1
Friday, January 8, 2010: 2:30 PM-4:30 PM
Torrey 1 (Marriott)
Chair:
Philip M. Soergel, University of Maryland at College Park
Commentator:
Philip M. Soergel, University of Maryland at College Park
Redemption of the Bride
Rabia Gregory, University of Missouri at Columbia
"Wrapped Up and Hidden in Him": Luther's Adaptation of the Madonna of Mercy Image
Margaret Arnold, Boston University

Source: http://aha.confex.com/aha/2010/webprogram/Session3722.html 

SAINTS AND SANCTITY

SAINTS AND SANCTITY



ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY SOCIETY

The Ecclesiastical History Society (EHS) aims to foster interest in,
and to advance the study of, all areas of the history of the Christian Churches.


The conferences for 2009-10 are on the theme of SAINTS AND SANCTITY, proposed by the President for the year, Professor Andrew Louth (University of Durham).
The Winter Meeting will be held on 9 January 2010 at the Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, University of London, from 10.30 until 4.30. The speakers will be Dr Alan Thacker (IHR), 'Popes, Patriarchs and Archbishops and the Origins of the Cult of the Martyrs', Dr Cordelia Warr (University of Manchester), 'Visualizing Stigmata: Stigmatic Saints and Crises of Representation in Late Medieval and Early Modern Italy', and Dr Richard Price (Heythrop College, London), 'The Canonization of St Serafim of Sarov: Piety, Prophecy and Politics in Late Imperial Russia'. For a programme and booking form, click here.
Source:  http://ehs.bangor.ac.uk/

The sixteenth biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place March 11–13, 2010, in Sarasota, Florida

The sixteenth biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place March 11–13, 2010, in Sarasota, Florida




The Conference is a biennial event covering all aspects of the Middle Ages and Renaissance; preparations are currently being made for the seventeenth Conference, which will be held March 11th to 13th, 2010, with Caroline Bruzelius of Duke University and Lori Anne Ferrell of Claremont Graduate University as plenary speakers.
The Conference is held in the Sudakoff Conference Center, on the historic bayfront campus of New College of Florida, the honors liberal arts college of the Florida state university system, which is located on the Gulf coast in Sarasota and next door to the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art.

2010 Program

The sixteenth biennial New College Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Studies will take place March 11–13, 2010, in Sarasota, Florida. The program that follows is correct as of 4 January 2010. Further details will be added as we ascertain them. Please check that your name and paper title are listed correctly and email any corrections to medren@ncf.edu. Many thanks, and we look forward to seeing you in March!
Except where noted, all conference events will be held in the Sudakoff Conference Center on the New College campus.
—The Program Committee

Schedule

Thursday, March 11th
9-10:30 am
Sessions 1-5

Break
10:45-12:15 pm
Sessions 6-10

Lunch
2:00-3:30 pm
Sessions 11-15

Break
3:45-5:15 pm
Sessions 16-20
5:30-7:00 pm
Conference Reception, College Hall
Friday, March 12th
9:00-10:30 am
Sessions 21-25

Break
10:45-12:30 pm
Sessions 26-30

Lunch
2:15-3:30 pm
Plenary I: “Battles for Bodies: Preaching, Burying and Building in the Medieval Italian City”
Caroline Bruzelius, Duke University
4:00-5:30 pm
Choice of Tours at the John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art
5:00-6:30 pm
Reception, Ringling Museum
Saturday, March 13th
9:00-10:30 am
Sessions 31-35

Break
10:45-12 noon
Plenary II: “Rereading the Complete Sermons: A New Direction for Donne Studies”
Lori Anne Ferrell, Claremont Graduate University

Lunch
2:00-3:30 pm
Sessions 36-40

Program

Session 1: Renaissance Rome
Chair: Samantha Kelly, Rutgers University

Papal Ceremony as a Tool of State: Martin V, Eugenius IV, and the Legacy of Avignon
Elizabeth McCahill, University of Massachusetts, Boston
The SPQR and the Reassertion of Papal Rule in Renaissance Rome
Carrie Benes, New College of Florida
Built Form and Meaning in the Sixteenth Century: The Building Campaigns of Pope Sixtus V, Counter Reform Style and a Spanish Connection
Rosanna Mortillaro, University of Western Ontario
Session 2: Women and Art
Chair: Maureen Zaremba, John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art

From Annunciation to Visitation at Reims Cathedral: Medieval Women as Wives and as Mothers
Marian Bleeke, Cleveland State University
The Naked, the Nude, and the Downright Unfeminine: Figures of Eve in Renaissance Italy
Allison Morgan, Case Western Reserve University

Savoldo’s Magdalen and the Veil: Meaning and Material in Renaissance Venice
Charlotte Nichols, Seton Hall University
Session 3: Conversion, Compulsion and Confusion: Religious Culture in Late Medieval and Renaissance Europe
Organized by Howard Louthan, University of Florida
Chair TBA

A Jew in the Margin: The Conversion Narrative in Medieval Culture
Nina Caputo, University of Florida
The Role of Compulsion in the Sacraments: The Forced Baptism of Aragonese Muslims, 1521-28
Ben Ehlers, University of Georgia
Humanism and Heterodoxy in Renaissance Poland: The Confusing Origins of Anti-Trinitarianism
Howard Louthan
Session 4: Early Modern Bodies, Sex, & Text
Chair: Miriam Wallace, New College of Florida

Setting Plato Straight: Sexuality and Medical Hermeneutics in the Renaissance
Todd W. Reeser, University of Pittsburgh
Dé-jà Wooing in Othello’s Venice and in Shakespeare's Sonnet 95
Barbara L. Estrin, Stonehill College
Marlowe with Sade
James Newlin, University of Florida
Session 5: Cross-Cultural Currents in Mediterranean Literature
Chair TBA

Representations of the Afterlife in Dante and the Islamic Mi’raj
Jean Hakes, Georgia Perimeter College, Clarkston
The Philosopher-Castaway from Medieval Andalusia to Modern Europe
Mahmoud Baroud, University of Sydney
Perché in Genoa al nido mio: Spiritual Colonialism in Tommaso Stigliani’s Il Mondo Nuovo
Mary Watt, University of Florida
+ + + + + + + + + + +
Session 6: Art in Renaissance Tuscany
Chair: Caroline Bruzelius, Duke University
Saints Matthew and Anthony Abbot as Franciscan Exemplars in the Cappella Migliorati, San Francesco (Prato)
Amber A. McAlister, University of Pittsburgh, Greensburg
Benvenuto di Giovanni’s Painted Prophets in Siena Cathedral
Timothy B. Smith, Birmingham-Southern College
Maiolica and Manuscripts in Renaissance Pesaro
Sarah Cartwright, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Session 7: High Medieval Saints and Mystics: Sources and Authorial Intent
Chair: Thomas McCarthy, New College of Florida

Saint’s Life as Soapbox: Authorial Self-Insertions and Asides in the Work of Jocelin of Furness
Lindsay Irvin, University of Toronto
A New Melody for Hildegard von Bingen’s Ordo virtutum
Matthew Steel, Western Michigan University
The Promise of Eternity: Love and Poetic Form in Hadewijch's Stanzaic Poems or Liederen
Steven Rozenski, Harvard University
Session 8: Learning and the Transformation of the Late Medieval City
Chair: David Scheffler, University of North Florida

The Sins of Urban Society in the Preaching of Blessed John Soreth
D. Henry Dieterich, University of Michigan
The Pied Piper of Hamelin, the Transformation of the Guild System, and the Journeymen's Story-telling
Ken Kurihara, Fordham University
Portrait of a Medieval Canon Lawyer: Heinrich of Saxony
Michael J. Alexander, Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Session 9: Contextualizing Marlowe
Organizer and Chair: Sara Munson Deats, University of South Florida

Christopher Marlowe, University Wit
Robert A. Logan, University of Hartford
The Jew of Malta and the Development of City Comedy: “The Mean Passage of a History”
Sarah K. Scott, Mount St. Mary's University
Searching for Faustus: The Context of Marlowe’s Great Tragedy
Sara Munson Deats
Session 10: The Crossroads of Travel and Identity in the Medieval Mediterranean
Organizer: Tovah Bender, Agnes Scott College
Chair: Kathryn L. Reyerson, University of Minnesota

Tarsiana’s Priestly Arts: Narration, Education, and Sacrament in the Libro de Apolonio
Matthew V. Desing, University of Texas, El Paso
On the Trail of Knowledge: Travel and Medical Education in the Middle Ages
Kira Robison, University of Minnesota
“Niccolaio of Lucca, Now of Florence”: Artisan Immigrants, Identity, and Social Networks
Tovah Bender
+ + + + + + + + + + +
Session 11: The Debate over Mary: Protestants, Catholics and Reform in Sixteenth-Century Italy
Organizer: Duane Osheim, University of Virginia
Chair: Konrad Eisenbichler, University of Toronto
Pier Paolo Vergerio and the Polemic over the Holy House of Loreto in Reformation Italy
Duane Osheim
Counter-Reformation Mary: Printed Miracle Books and the Defense of Marian Piety
David D’Andrea, Oklahoma State University
Protestants, Demons, and the Virgin: An Exorcist’s Defense of Marian Images
Sherri Franks Johnson, University of California, Riverside
Session 12: Renaissance Tombs
Chair TBA
“That’s Not Really What I Was Going For”: Rejected Commissions in Italian Renaissance Art
Colleen Halpin, Case Western Reserve University
The Monument to Doge Leonardo Loredan in Ss Giovanni e Paolo (Venice) as Power Play
Adrienne DeAngelis, Courtauld Institute
Eternity under the Arches: Leon Battista Alberti, Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta and the Façade of the Tempio Malatestiano
Mimi Ginsberg, University of Maryland
Session 13: Tudor/Stuart Culture: Rhetoric and its Contexts
Organizers: Natalie Mears, University of Durham, and John F. McDiarmid, New College of Florida
Chair: Scott Lucas, The Citadel
Education in Political Rhetoric in Early Modern English Grammar Schools
Markku Peltonen, University of Helsinki
Governance and Persuasion in Early Modern English Localities
Phil Withington, Cambridge University
Physic and Rhetoric in Early Modern England
Jennifer Richards, Newcastle University
Session 14: Shakespeares Imitations  I—In Honor of Prof. Mark Taylor
Chair: Anthony DiMatteo, New York Institute of Technology

Imitation and Adaptation in The Two Noble Kinsmen
Joel N. Feimer, Mercy College
Troilus and Cressida in the Light of Day: Shakespeare Reading Chaucer
Daniel M. Murtaugh, Florida Atlantic University
Shakespeare Imitating Montaigne
Joseph B. Wagner, Kent State University
Session 15: Minority Voices in Late Antique Christianity
Organizer: Robert McEachnie, University of Florida
Chair: Susan Marks, New College of Florida

Jews as the Other “Race” in Fifth-Century Northern Italy
Robert McEachnie, University of Florida
“Can You Hear Her Now?”: The Woman's Voice in Patristic Literature
Amy Hughes, Wheaton College
Redeeming the Memory of an “Arian” Past: Representation of Mission in the Fifth Century
Anna Lankina-Webb, University of Florida
+ + + + + + + + + + +
Session 16: Rethinking and Rewriting the Past in the Italian Renaissance
Chair: Duane Osheim, University of Virginia
The Renaissance and the Print Revolution Reconsidered: The Case of Neapolitan Historiography
Samantha Kelly, Rutgers University
The “Judicious Antiquarian”: A Reexamination of Cinquecento Ferrarese Historiography
Richard Tristano, Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota
Machiavelli’s Bitter Ironies: Alberti and The Prince
William J. Connell, Seton Hall University
Session 17: Renaissance Masters
Chair: Virginia Brilliant, John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Nothing As It Seems: Annotations (Reconstructive and Deconstructive) upon Domenico Bernini’s Life of the Cavalier Gian Lorenzo Bernini
Franco Mormando, Boston College
Poesia and Portraiture: Titian’s Allegory of Prudence Reconsidered
Jerry Marino, Johns Hopkins University
The Gift of Rubens: Rethinking the Concept of Gift-Giving in Early Modern Diplomatic Culture
Michael Auwers, Universiteit Antwerpen
Session 18: Tudor/Stuart Culture: Aristocratic Women
Organizer: Natalie Mears, University of Durham
Chair: Elizabeth H. Hageman, University of New Hampshire

Mary, Lady Cheke: Surviving at Court through Five Reigns
John McDiarmid, New College of Florida
Elizabethan Noblewomen and Local Politics: Katherine, Duchess of Suffolk, and Bess of Hardwick
Alan Bryson, University of Sheffield
The Villiers Women at Court, 1628-1641
Sara Wolfson, University of Durham
Session 19: Shakespeares Imitations II—In Honor of Prof. Mark Taylor
Chair: R.A. Shoaf, University of Florida

“The Jerks of Invention”: Shakespeare and Serious Play in the Renaissance
Anthony DiMatteo, New York Institute of Technology
Hearing and Metahearing in Hamlet
Laury Magnus, US Merchant Marine Academy
Leering in Lear
Marvin Hunt, North Carolina State University
Session 20: Early Medieval Texts & Contexts
Chair: David Rohrbacher, New College of Florida

Relic Ordeals by Fire in Visigothic Iberia
Mary Lester, University of Florida
The Martyrs of Cordoba and Changing Identities in Ninth-Century Muslim Spain
Alexandra de Padua, University of Florida
A Wolf with Sheep-Skin Papyri: Lupus of Ferrières and the Preservation of the Classical Past in the Carolingian Age
Sean Lafferty, University of Toronto

+ + + + + + + + + + +

Session 21: New Directions in the History of Medieval Southern Italy
Organizer: Valerie Ramseyer, Wellesley College
Chair: Carrie Benes, New College of Florida

Archaeology and the Study of Southern Italy and Sicily in the Early Middle Ages
Valerie Ramseyer, Wellesley College
From Robert Guiscard to Andreuccio of Perugia: Northern Italian Perspectives on the Regno during the Middle Ages
Joanna Drell, University of Richmond
Courtly Models: The Entertainments of the Counts of Ceccano
Carol Lansing, University of California, Santa Barbara
Session 22: Medieval French Romance
Chair TB
A
Masculinities in Chrétien de Troyes: A Homoerotic Subtext
Basil A. Clark, Saginaw Valley State University
Matter of Greece, Rome, Britain, or France? Political Ideology and Literary History in Chrétien de Troyes’s Cligés
Levilson C. Reis, Otterbein College
Garden Walls and Perfume: Definitions of Space in Le Roman de la Rose
Elizabeth Lucia, Rhodes College
Session 23: Tudor/Stuart Culture: Executions
Organizers: Natalie Mears, University of Durham, and John F. McDiarmid, New College of Florida
Chair: Natalie Mears

Judicial Punishment in Ideal Societies
Cathy Shrank, University of Sheffield
Dressing for the Block: The Significance of Clothing Worn at Royal and Noble Executions in Sixteenth-Century England
Maria Hayward, University of Southampton
Painted Copies of John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments: Their Production and Purpose
Elizabeth Evenden, Brunel University
Session 24: Sidneian Poetics, Sacred and Profane
Sponsored by the Sidney Society
Organized by Joel Davis, Stetson University
Chair TBA

Sir Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella as Occasional Verse: The Autobiographical Problem of Sidney Criticism from the Point of View of Manuscript Culture
Teemu Manninen, Finnish Graduate School of Literary Studies
“The Sunn-Beames of thy Face”: Re-Revealing God in the Countess of Pembroke's Psalmes
Claire Falck, University of Wisconsin
Sidney’s Epistolary Muse: The Defense of Poetry and Generic Ambivalence in Astrophil and Stella
Adam Neff, University of Virginia
Session 25: New Contexts for Beowulf
Chair: Nicole Guenther Discenza, University of South Florida

Blurring Distinctions Between the Mythological and Heroic in Old English and Old Norse Poetry
Ruth Cheadle, St Hilda’s College, Oxford
Beowulf and Thor: Additional Analogues?
Alexander M. Bruce, University of the South
Beowulf’s Arm/s
Lizz Angello, University of South Florida

+ + + + + + + + + + +

Session 26: Household and City-State: Social Relations in Renaissance Tuscany
Chair: Margery Ganz, Spelman College
Marital Relationships and Household Dynamics in Renaissance Florence
Megan Moran, College of Charleston
The Logistics of Trust: Aspects of Late Medieval Business Practices Among the Alberti and their Parenti
Susannah F. Baxendale, Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
The Grand Ducal State through the Eyes of a Tuscan Grand Duchess
Giovanna Benadusi, University of South Florida
Opportunities for and Barriers to the Creation of a Tuscan “Nobility” in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
Judith Brown, Wesleyan University
Session 27: Religion, Rhetoric, and Education in Early Modern France
Chair: Amy Reid, New College of Florida
Silence and the Disconnected Poet: Possible Implications of Deafness in Du Bellay’s Les Regrets
David de Posada, Georgia College & State University
Marguerite de Navarre’s l’Heptaméron: A Finely-Tuned Sensitivity to Ancient and Renaissance Conceptions and Theories of Humor
Kristin Wasielewski, Franklin College
Torture, Martyrdom, and Social Pollution: An Image from Richard Verstegan's Theatrum crudelitatum haereticorum nostri temporis
Erin Glunt, Yale University
Poetry and Education in the Early Modern: The Petites Écoles of Port-Royal
Christine McCall Probes, University of South Florida
Session 28: Writing English Religious Identity
Chair: Heather White, New College of Florida
Assimilating the Ovidian: Christian Marriage as Conversion Technique in John Metham’s Amoryus and Cleopes
Jennifer M. Gianfalla, Young Harris College
Prospero’s Exile: A Sacramental-Historical Reading of The Tempest
Todd Edmondson, University of Louisville
Heresy and the Use of Allegory: Constructing the Radical Persona in Early Modern England
Douglas F. Jones, University of Iowa
George Herbert’s Anglican Anagrams and Mental Pictures
Jean-Christophe Van Thienen, Université Lille3
Session 29: Artful Passions among Sidneian Romances
Sponsor: The Sidney Society
Chair: Kathryn DeZur, State University of New York, Delhi

“Some kind of measure”: Form, Genre, and Authorship in Lady Mary Wroth’s Urania
Kristiane Stapleton, University of Wisconsin
Thought and Movement: Et in Arcadia est
Brad Tuggle, Spring Hill College
Closure and the Politics of Form in Sir Philip Sidney’s Poetics
Andrew Wadoski, Oklahoma State University
The Psychology of Happiness and Woe in Protestant Internationalist Writings and Sidney’s Old Arcadia
Wendy Olmsted, University of Chicago
Session 30: Civic Institutions
Chair: Thomas Kuehn, Clemson University

Plainchant & Prestige: Chant Composition at the Cathedral of San Zeno, Pistoia
James Vincent Maiello, Vanderbilt University
The Presence and Absence of Peacemaking Rituals in Fourteenth-Century Italian Cities
Glenn Kumhera, University of the South
Who’s in Charge Here? Office and Lordship in a Small Catalan Town
Gregory Milton, University of South Florida
Perugia’s Podestà and the Circumstances of his Citizenship
Jennifer Konieczny, University of Toronto

+ + + + + + + + + + +

Session 31: Observing and Transmitting Culture in Mid-Cinquecento Tuscany
Organizer: Konrad Eisenbichler, Victoria College, University of Toronto
Chair:
Nicholas Terpstra, Victoria College, University of Toronto

“The country is large and beautiful and happy”: Lelio Pecci’s Diary of his 1549 Mission to Flanders
Elena Brizio, Medici Archive Project
On Wings of Song: The Musical Fortune of a Poetic Gloss
Konrad Eisenbichler, Victoria College, University of Toronto
Entertaining the Medici: Beltramo Poggi’s Plays for Francesco and Isabella de’ Medici
Gianni Cicali, Georgetown University
Session 32: Ideal and Reality in Medieval Governance
Chair: Gregor
y Milton, University of South Florida
Rebellion and the Perversion of Order in Frutolf of Michelsberg’s Chronicle
T. J. H. McCarthy, New College of Florida
Re-colonizing France: Templar Organization in the County of Champagne
Michael J. Peixoto, New York University
Burgesses under Secular and Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction in the Latin Kingdom of Cyprus (Twelfth to Sixteenth Centuries)
Marwan Nader, Cambridge University
Session 33: Tudor/Stuart Culture: Media for History
Organizers:
Natalie Mears, University of Durham, and John F. McDiarmid, New College of Florida
Chair: John F. McDiarmid

Henry VIII and the Problem of Historical Perspective in Edward Hall’s Chronicle
Scott Lucas, The Citadel
Letters and History: Private Correspondence and the Creation of a Narrative
Roger Kuin, York University
The Threads of (Personal) History: Lord Admiral Howard’s Tapestries of the Spanish Armada
Natalie Mears, University of Durham
Session 34: Stages of Early Modern Drama
Chair: Julienne H. Empric, Eckerd College

Staging Space and Time: Theater Design in The Menaechmi and The Comedy of Errors
Jennifer Low, Florida Atlantic University
A Most Conspicuous Eminence: Onstage Seating in the Caroline Private Theater
Nova Myhill, New College of Florida
“Exceeding rare & full of variety”: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Seventeenth-Century Masque
Eliza Fisher Laskowski, Peace College
Session 35: Shaping Identity in Fourteenth-Century Literature
Chair: Angela Tenga, Florida Institute of Technology

Resemblance, or the Importance of Paternity: Ideological Reflections of the Patrilineage in Boccaccio’s Ninfale fiesolano
Kristen Swann, Columbia University
The Domesticating of Sister Emelye in Chaucer’s The Knight’s Tale
Liam O. Purdon, Doane College
Traumatic Loss and the Internal Landscape of Memory in Pearl
Anthony Adams, Brown University
+ + + + + + + + + + +

Session 36: Social Responsibility in Late Medieval & Renaissance Italy
Chair:
Jacqueline Gutwirth, Bronx Community College

Mendicant Prisons in Late Medieval Italy
Lezlie Knox, Marquette University
A Very Pious Union: Confraternities in the Bolognese Contado
Matthew Thomas Sneider, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth
Icons of Charity and the Limits to the Reform of Poor Relief in Cinquecento Bologna Nicholas Terpstra, Victoria College, University of Toronto
Session 37: Discourses of Literature and Theology in Early Modern Spain
Chair: Maria Esformes, University of South Florida

Fray Luis de León’s Spanish Commentary on the Song of Solomon and the Question of Biblical Translation
Mike Fulton, Wake Forest University
Oratoriae Libri: The Theological Discourse within Celestina by Fernando de Rojas
Martha Garcia, University of Central Florida
The Material Celestina: The Literary Value of Objects in Early Modern Spain
Samuel Sánchez-Sánchez, Davidson College
Session 38: Tudor/Stuart Culture: Religious Practices, from Liturgy to Laughter
Organizer:
John F. McDiarmid, New College of Florida
Chair: Lori Anne Ferrell, Claremont Graduate University

Bringing Home the Becon (and Whittingham, and Gilby…): Exile Writing and Practice in the Elizabethan Settlement
Beth Quitslund, Ohio University
Imaginary Calendars and Parodic “Saints” in Some Early Modern Satirical Almanacs
Anne Lake Prescott, Barnard College
Volpone’s Colorless Heaven
Suzanne Penuel, University of South Carolina, Lancaster
Session 39: Negotiating Female Authority in Medieval and Early Modern England
Chair: Nova Myhill, New College of Florida

Sexual Purity as Property: Economic Exchange in the Life of Christina of Markyate, the Vie de Seinte Audree, and the Book of Margery Kempe
Sally Livingston, Harvard University
Mothers of Sons Challenging Masculine Identity in the Chester Cycle
Betty Ellzey, Shepherd Universty
Maintaining the Quiet of the Country: Elizabeth I and Joan Fitzgerald, Countess of Desmond
Karen A. Holland, Providence College
“Natures House”:  Margaret Cavendish and the Country House Poem
Lise Mae Schlosser, Northern Illinois University
Session 40: New Perspectives on Medieval England
Chair: Boyd Breslow, Florida Atlantic University

Shame, Masculinity, and the Killing of Thomas Becket
Hugh M. Thomas, University of Miami
The Children of King John and Isabelle of Angoulême and their Upbringing
Ralph V. Turner, Florida State University
The County Elite and Political Power in Early Tudor Somerset, 1485-1547
Simon Lambe, St Mary’s University College, London




Source and more...: http://faculty.ncf.edu/medievalstudies/program10.html

Vagantes Traveling Medieval Graduate Student Conference

Vagantes
Traveling Medieval Graduate Student Conference

2010 Conference: March 11 - 13, 2010
The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque


Vagantes Medieval Graduate Student Conference 2010

March 11 - 13, 2010
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque

Welcome to the homepage of Vagantes, an annual, traveling conference for graduate students studying any aspect of the Middle Ages. The conference was conceived with several goals in mind: fostering a sense of community among junior medievalists, providing exposure to an interdisciplinary forum, and showcasing the resources of the host institutions -- all hopefully within a student budget.
Currently, you can view the call for papers and find out information about lodging. Additional information, including registration instructions, will be posted throughout the summer.
You can also join our Facebook Group to meet other Vagantes members.
Announcement: Vagantes 2011 will be hosted by the University of Pittsburgh.

Program

All Events will take place in Student Union Building (SUB) Ballroom A unless otherwise noted.
A more detailed program with session information will be posted in January.
Thursday, 11 March
7:00-9:00PM Welcome Reception at O’Neill’s on Central
Friday, 12 March
8:00-9:30AM Registration and Breakfast
9:30-9:40AM Welcome Remarks
9:40-11:00AM Session I
11:00-11:20AM Break
11:20AM-12:40PM Session II
12:40-2:20PM Lunch, not provided. See Registration packet for food options in SUB and nearby
2:20-3:40PM Session III
3:40-4:00PM Coffee Break
4:00-5:20PM Session IV
5:30-6:30 Keynote Address: Timothy Graham, Dept. of History, University of New Mexico, in SUB Santa Ana A&B
6:30-7:30PM Keynote Reception in SUB Scholars
Saturday, 13 March
8:00-9:30AM Registration and Breakfast
9:40-11:00AM Session V
11:00-11:20AM Break
11:20AM-12:40PM Session VI
12:40-2:00PM General Meeting with provided lunch
2:00-3:20PM Session VII
3:20-3:40PM Coffee Break
3:40-5:00PM Session VIII
5:00-6:00PM Keynote Address: Hannah Johnson, Dept. of English, University of Pittsburgh, in SUB Santa Ana A&B
6:00-7:00PM Keynote Reception in SUB Scholars
7:00-9:00PM Banquet and Closing Remarks

Source and more...: http://www.vagantesconference.org/program.html

16th annual postgraduate medieval conference

Postgraduate Conference

BIRTHA Medieval Postgraduate Conference 2010: Language & Silence

26th-27th February 2010

The University of Bristol hosts the longest-running international medieval postgraduate conference in the UK. Each year we offer medievalists the opportunity to present their research, discuss ideas, and foster links bridging disciplinary and geographical boundaries. This year the conference is in its 16th year, and we are inviting proposals for papers from postgraduates and early career scholars on the theme of ‘Language and Silence’.
Issues of language and silence permeate both religious and political life in the Middle Ages: from attempts to engage with and communicate spiritual experience, to the complex negotiations involved in balancing the demands of the solitary religious life with the needs of the community, to the political pressures on everyday language in times when charges of heresy are a real concern. In private life, too, the ability or authority to speak was governed by a complex array of theological, philosophical and social codes. This conference aims to address issues such as these in the context of medieval life, and also some of the broader issues of language, and its absence, raised by such debate.


Source: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/medievalcentre/postgraduate-conference/index_html


.


26-27 February 2010. 'Language and Silence', the 16th annual postgraduate medieval conference, to be held at the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol. The University of Bristol hosts the longest-running international medieval postgraduate conference in the UK . Each year we offer medievalists the opportunity to present their research, discuss ideas, and foster links bridging disciplinary and geographical boundaries. This year we invite proposals for papers from postgraduates and early career scholars on the theme of ‘Language and Silence'. Issues of language and silence permeate both religious and political life in the Middle Ages: from attempts to engage with and communicate spiritual experience, to the complex negotiations involved in balancing the demands of the solitary religious life with the needs of the community, to the political pressures on everyday language in times when charges of heresy are a real concern. In private life, too, the ability or authority to speak was governed by a complex array of theological, philosophical and social codes. This conference aims to address issues such as these in the context of medieval life, and also some of the broader issues of language, and its absence, raised by such debate. Call for papers deadline: 8 January 2010. Further information: Edwina Thorn, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol, Graduate School of Arts, 7 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TB, UK; Edwina.Thorn@bristol.ac.uk

Source: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/med_online/calendar2010.html

Language & Silence - 16th Annual Postgraduate Medieval Conference

Date:
26 February 2010 - 27 February 2010
Master Class with Professor Bernard McGinn (University of Chicago), ‘Communicating the Incommunicable: Mystical Ineffability from Origen to Catherine of Siena’
The University of Bristol hosts the longest-running international medieval postgraduate conference in the UK. Each year we offer medievalists the opportunity to present their research, discuss ideas, and foster links bridging disciplinary and geographical boundaries. This year we invite proposals for papers from postgraduates and early career scholars on the theme of ‘Language and Silence’.
Issues of language and silence permeate both religious and political life in the Middle Ages: from attempts to engage with and communicate spiritual experience, to the complex negotiations involved in balancing the demands of the solitary religious life with the needs of the community, to the political pressures on everyday language in times when charges of heresy are a real concern. In private life, too, the ability or authority to speak was governed by a complex array of theological, philosophical and social codes. This conference aims to address issues such as these in the context of medieval life, and also some of the broader issues of language, and its absence, raised by such debate.
Topics may include but are not limited to:
  • The said and the unsaid
  • Ineffability, inexpressibility and the limitations of language
  • The suppression of speech or ideas, whether psychological, social, political or religious
  • Interactions between language and silence in the religious life
  • The interaction between verbal and non-verbal languages
  • Interpretation and the construction of meaning
  • Texts that display a foregrounding of language
  • Issues of language and identity.
Papers should be no more than 20 minutes long.
Abstracts of 250-300 words should be sent by email (by preference) to: Edwina Thorn (Edwina.Thorn@bristol.ac.uk) or to Edwina Thorn, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol, Graduate School of Arts, 7 Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1TB, UK.
Deadline for receipt of abstracts: January 8th, 2010.
The conference is free of charge, and some bursaries to help cover travel costs might be available for presenters travelling long distances to attend. Further details (e.g. full programme, registration details and information about accommodation) will be posted online as they become available.
URL:
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/medievalcentre/
Conference organiser(s):
Edwina Thorn
Location:
University of Bristol

Event deadlines

Call for papers deadline:
8 January 2010

Contact details

Edwina Thorn

Source: http://www.history.ac.uk/events/conferences/1000

Les Bibles atlantiques: Le manuscrit biblique à l'époque de la réforme ecclésiastique du XIe siècle




Les Bibles atlantiques: Le manuscrit biblique à l'époque de la réforme ecclésiastique du XIe siècle
Université de Genève, 25-27 février 2010 
Les Bibles atlantiques. Le manuscrit biblique à l’époque de la réforme ecclésiastique du XIe siècle
Les Bibles atlantiques, produites entre la moitié du XIe et la moitié du XIIe siècle dans la région de Rome, constituent un genre particulier du manuscrit biblique. Ces manuscrits présentent des caractères spécifiques et un degré plutôt élevé d’uniformité de tous les caractères matériels et textuels. La production et la circulation de ces manuscrits bibliques s’inscrivent dans le mouvement de renouveau moral et spirituel de l’Église au XIe siècle que les historiens appellent couramment la Réforme grégorienne. Avec leurs caractéristiques matérielles et textuelles, les Bibles atlantiques semblent bien répondre à l’exigence des réformateurs romains de définir un modèle qui puisse s’imposer par l’autorité théologique du contenu et par la monumentalité de l’aspect extérieur.
Le Colloque international de Genève représentera la première occasion pour faire le bilan historiographique des recherches consacrées à la production, la circulation et l’emploi des Bibles atlantiques ; il constituera également un moment précieux d’échanges et de confrontation entre les spécialistes et tous ceux qui, dans leurs recherches d’archives et dans les fonds médiévaux, se sont rapprochés de ces manuscrits.
Comme les études les plus récentes l’ont montré, les problématiques liées à la réalisation des Bibles atlantiques, ainsi qu’au contexte de la production, de la circulation et de l’utilisation de ces livres, demandent nécessairement une étude interdisciplinaire de spécialistes en histoire médiévale, en philologie et histoire de la Vulgate, en science de la Liturgie et en histoire du livre manuscrit. Cette manifestation permettra d’aborder le phénomène de la production des Bibles atlantiques selon différentes perspectives d’analyse combinant histoire culturelle, religieuse et matérielle avec le contexte historique et la liturgie. De même, les aspects textuels, codicologiques, paléographies et ornementaux du manuscrit seront largement traités. Le Colloque, principalement axé sur les Bibles atlantiques d’origine italienne, prévoit également des conférences sur la production des manuscrits atlantiques non bibliques, ainsi que sur les manuscrits géants de la Vulgate réalisés au XIe siècle en dehors de l’Italie. Dans les détails, les thèmes abordés dans le Colloque seront les suivants :
Histoire du livre manuscrit. La réalisation d’un manuscrit géant contenant le texte complet de la Vulgate, tel que les Bibles atlantiques, a nécessairement posé plusieurs problèmes d’ordre technique, ainsi que des contraintes liées à d’organisation et à la distribution du travail entre les différents artisans du livre. Les communications pourront concerner : analyse des différents aspects de la production matérielle des Bibles atlantiques ; méthodes et procédés techniques adoptés dans la réalisation des manuscrits monumentaux de la Bible et d’autres manuscrits non bibliques ; organisation et distribution du travail de copie et de l’exécution de l’apparat ornemental ; analyse de la production contemporaine d’autres manuscrits géants de la Bible dans le milieu de réformateurs du XIe siècle ; présentation ponctuelle et détaillée d’exemplaires de Bibles atlantiques et/ou d’autres manuscrits atlantiques encore peu connus et qui présentent un intérêt spécifique.
Philologie biblique et histoire de la Vulgate au XIe siècle. A partir de la recension textuelle des Bibles atlantiques, on souhaite contribuer à l’histoire de la Vulgate au XIe siècle, qui a vu nombre d’innovations en matière de production du livre et de révision du texte biblique. Cette section du Colloque concernera l’établissement du texte biblique contenu dans les Bibles atlantiques et dans d’autres manuscrits bibliques de la même époque, à savoir le choix des livres considérés comme canoniques, la définition de l’ordre des livres bibliques, les critères d’édition de la Vulgate adoptés par les réformateurs romains.
Emploi des manuscrits monumentaux de la Bible. Les Bibles atlantiques, conçues en tant qu’emblème de la réforme ecclésiastique du XIe siècle, sont également employées dans des communautés religieuses bien déterminées, auxquelles elles étaient destinées dès l’origine. Dans le cadre du Colloque on propose d’analyser les circonstances et les modalités d’utilisation du manuscrit biblique de format géant.
La réforme ecclésiastique du XIe siècle et la production du texte biblique. A partir de l’histoire des Bibles atlantiques, on propose d’investiguer sur la vie religieuse locale, sur les rapports hiérarchiques entre les hauts prélats et le clergé, sur l’activité pastorale des évêques qui figurent parmi les promoteurs de la réforme et, en même temps, parmi les commanditaires des Bibles atlantiques. 

Propositions de communications

Les propositions de communication (1000 signes maximum) devront être adressées par courrier électronique avant le 30 septembre 2009 à la personne de contact. Le Comité scientifique donnera une réponse à partir du 15 octobre 2009.

Comité organisateur du Colloque

  • Nadia Togni  (Faculté de théologie, Université de Genève)
  • Prof. Maurizio Perugi (Faculté des lettres, Université de Genève)
  •  Prof. Michel Grandjean (Faculté de théologie, Université de Genève)
  •  Françoise Briegel (Maison de l’Histoire, Université de Genève)

Comité scientifique

  • Mme Nadia Togni (Faculté théologie, Université de Genève)
  •  M. Michel Grandjean (Faculté de théologie, Université de Genève)
  •  M. Maurizio Perugi (Faculté des Lettres, Université de Genève)
  •  M. Jean-Yves Tilliette (Faculté des Lettres, Université de Genève)
  •  Dom Giustino Farnedi (Vice-directeur du Centro storico benedettino italiano, Archives de l’Abbaye de San Pietro à Perugia, Italie)
  •  M. Guy Lobrichon (Directeur du Laboratoire d’Histoire, Faculté des Lettres, Université d’Avignon, France)
  • Mme Marilena Maniaci (Facoltà di lettere, Università di Cassino, Italie)
  •  Mme Giulia Orofino (Facoltà di lettere, Università di Cassino, Italie)

Mots-clés
  • Giant Bible, The 11th Century Ecclesiastic Reform
Lieu
  • Genève (Suisse) (Université de Genève )
Date limite
  • mercredi 30 septembre 2009
Contact
  • Nadia Togni
    courriel : nadia [point] togni (at) unige [point] ch
    Faculté de théologie – Uni Bastions – 5, rue De-Candolle, CH-1211 Genève 4

Source de l'information
  • Nadia Togni
    courriel : nadia [point] togni (at) unige [point] ch 
Source:
« Les Bibles atlantiques  », Appel à contribution, Calenda, publié le lundi 24 août 2009, http://calenda.revues.org/nouvelle14257.html

The Past's Digital Presence: Database, Archive, and Knowledge Work in the Humanities



How is digital technology changing methods of scholarly research with pre-digital sources in the humanities? If the “medium is the message,” then how does the message change when primary sources are translated into digital media? What kinds of new research opportunities do databases unlock and what do they make obsolete? What is the future of the rare book and manuscript library and its use? What biases are inherent in the widespread use of digitized material? How can we correct for them? Amidst numerous benefits in accessibility, cost, and convenience, what concerns have been overlooked?
Keynote Speaker
Peter Stallybrass, Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Humanities, University of Pennsylvania
Colloquium Speaker
Jacqueline Goldsby, Associate Professor, University of Chicago

Closing Roundtable
Rolena Adorno, Reuben Post Halleck Professor of Spanish, Yale University
Edward Ayers, President, University of Richmond
Willard McCarty, Professor of Humanities Computing, King’s College London
George Miles, Curator, Western Americana Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Source and more: http://digitalhumanities.yale.edu/pdp/about-this-conference/

The Ends of Romance? Illinois Medieval Association & Medieval Association of the Midwest Conference February 18-20, 2010 0 Keynote speakers: Prof. Tom Hanks, Baylor University Prof. Robert Hanning, Columbia University Dominican University, River Forest, IL

"The Ends of Romance" - February 18-20, 2010 at Dominican University, River Forest, IL




Illinois Medieval Association & Medieval Association of the Midwest
contact email:
msweeney@dom.edu
cfp categories:
medieval
renaissance
The Illinois Medieval Association and Medieval Association of the Midwest invites proposals for papers on the theme of "The Ends of Romance?". We are thinking about this topic in the broadest of terms and invite proposals from history, music, art history, theology, English, and language studies as well as any other areas of interest.
The romances have often been considered to be an access point into the cultures of the medieval world, and we would be interested in examining why, how, and if we should be having such critical discussions. As a second strand to the conference we will also be examining penitential/ sacramental thinking and how it relates to these themes in the middle ages.

Conference Website with a form for the "CFP" and information on fees, housing, travel, etc: http://domin.dom.edu/imam/
Our two keynote addresses will be given by:
Prudential Penitence:
Robert Hanning, Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, will examine the nature and implications of the medieval adaptation of aural confession by the Church, which required from her members exercise of ethical and rhetorical practice originating in classical antiquity. Then, he will explore some of the ways in which "prudential penitence" was appropriated by authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio as a component of some of their most trenchant and most amusing fictions about both clergy and laity. His forthcoming book, Serious Play: Crises of Desire and Authority in the Poetry of Ovid, Chaucer, and Ariosto is to be published by the Columbia University Press. This event co-sponsored by the Department of English and the Illinois Medieval Association conference.
Malory and the Christian Happy Ending:
D. Thomas Hanks, Jr., is Professor of English Literature at Baylor University. He will speaking about Malory's Morte Darthur which partakes of the nature of a "fairy story," as J. R. R. Tolkien defines fairy stories. As such, it embodies a Secondary World which includes magic, perilous realms, unexpected magical dangers (e.g., Morgan), as well as the sun, the moon, the stars above, and ordinary humans going about their business as best they can (to paraphrase Tolkien's On Fairy Stories). It also contains what Tolkien calls a "eucatastrophe"-a happy ending which partakes of the nature of what Malory would have seen as the evangelion-a specifically Christian happy ending.
Papers delivered at the conference are eligible for publication in Essays In Medieval Studies (IMA) or Enarratio (MAM).

 Schedule

Opening night of the conference: Thursday, February 18, 2010

Registration 6:00pm-7:00pm Parmer Hall /Dominican University Keynote Address I
Prudential Penitence: Robert Hanning,
7:00 pm / Bluhm Lecture Hall - Parmer Hall /Dominican University
Robert Hanning, Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University, will examine the nature and implications of the medieval adaptation of aural confession by the Church, which required from her members exercise of ethical and rhetorical practice originating in classical antiquity. Then, he will explore some of the ways in which "prudential penitence" was appropriated by authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio as a component of some of their most trenchant and most amusing fictions about both clergy and laity. His forthcoming book, Serious Play: Crises of Desire and Authority in the Poetry of Ovid, Chaucer, and Ariosto is to be published by the Columbia University Press. This event co-sponsored by the Department of English and the Illinois Medieval Association conference.
Reception to follow

Friday February 19, 2010

8:00–12:00 pm Registration Parmer Hall/ Dominican University
8:00–9:00 am Continental Breakfast
9:00–10:30 am Sessions
10:30–11:00 am Coffee
11:00–12:30 pm Sessions
12:45–2:00 pm Lunch
2:00–3:30 pm Sessions
3:30–4:00 pm Coffee
4:00–5:30 pm Sessions
6:00 pm Those signed-up for Chicago Symphony Hall event will meet at the front of Dominican’s Parmer Hall
to catch bus; for more information see the Registration page.

Saturday February 20, 2010

9:00-9:30 am Coffee and Continental Breakfast Keynote Address II:
Malory and the Christian Happy Ending: Thomas Hanks
9:30 am Bluhm Lecture Hall /Parmer Hall /Dominican University
D. Thomas Hanks, Jr., is Professor of English Literature at Baylor University. He will speaking about Malory's Morte Darthur which partakes of the nature of a "fairy story," as J. R. R. Tolkien defines fairy stories. As such, it embodies a Secondary World which includes magic, perilous realms, unexpected magical dangers (e.g., Morgan), as well as the sun, the moon, the stars above, and ordinary humans going about their business as best they can (to paraphrase Tolkien's On Fairy Stories). It also contains what Tolkien calls a “eucatastrophe”–a happy ending which partakes of the nature of what Malory would have seen as the evangelion–a specifically Christian happy ending.

Source: http://call-for-papers.sas.upenn.edu/node/34646

Victoria and Albert Museum

Revealing Medieval and Renaissance Europe


 

Makers and Markets 1100-1600
Thursday 18 - Saturday 20 February
Lecture Theatre
10.30-17.00

This conference examines artistic production in the period 1100–1600, how objects were traded and used, and what they reveal about the culture in which they were produced.Continuities and change across the ‘medieval’ and ‘renaissance’ periods will be highlighted. The conference themes are ‘Making’,‘Settings’ and ‘Consumers’, and it concludes with a debate led by Malcolm Baker. Speakers include Paul Binski, Caroline Campbell,Joanna Cannon, Caroline Elam,Jacqueline Musacchio, John Paoletti, Evelyn Welch andPaul Williamson.
£75, £60 concessions, £15 students for three days,
£50, £40 concessions, £10 students for two days,
£25, £20 concessions, £5 students for one day
Book online or call +44 (0)20 7942 2211


source: http://www.vam.ac.uk/activ_events/courses/conferences/#revealing 

V Simposio Internacional de Jóvenes Medievalistas, 17-19 de marzo (2010)

 V Simposio Internacional de Jóvenes Medievalistas 



información y Contacto
Juan Francisco Jiménez Alcázar
Dpto. Prehistoria, Arqueología, Historia Antigua, Historia Medieval y CCTTHH.
Facultad de Letras, Campus de la Merced
Universidad de Murcia
c/ Santo Cristo, 1
30001 MURCIA
Tfo. 968 363249
Email de contacto:
info@jovenesmedievalistas.net
jimealca@um.es
cem@um.es
Comité Organizador - Comité Científico

DIRECTOR
Juan Francisco Jiménez Alcázar
Universidad de Murcia
SECRETARÍA
Jorge Maíz Chacón
UNED - C.A. Illes Balears
Inés Calderón Medina
Universidad de Valladolid
COMITÉ CIENTÍFICO
Beatriz Arízaga Bolumburu
Universidad de Cantabria
Betsabé Caunedo del Potro
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
María Bonet Donato
Universitat Roviri i Virgili
Manuel Ruzafa García
Universitat de Valencia

Organiza:

Centro de Estudios Medievales de la Universidad de Murcia



Patrocina:
Excmo. Ayuntamiento de Lorca
Concejalía de Cultura, Festejos y Participación Ciudadana
Consejo Municipal de Cultura


Colabora:
Fundación Cajamurcia


Real Academia Alfonso X el Sabio

Tabularium

Hotel Jardines de Lorca

Sociedad Española de Estudios Medievales


Universidad de Murcia


medievalismo.org - portal de historia medieval




Source: http://jovenesmedievalistas.net/nuevo.htm

Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Conference Submission System Humanity and the Natural World in the Middle Ages and Renaissance



Humanity and the Natural World
in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

11 - 13 February 2010 in Tempe, Arizona

ACMRS invites session and paper proposals for its annual
interdisciplinary conference to be held February 11 - 13, 2010 in Tempe,
Arizona. We welcome papers that explore any topic related to the study
and teaching of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and especially those
that focus on this year\'s theme of humanity and the natural world, both
in literal and metaphorical manifestations.

Selected papers related to the conference theme will be considered for
publication in the conference volume of the Arizona Studies in the
Middle Ages and the Renaissance series, published by Brepols Publishers
(Belgium).

The conference keynote speaker will be Pamela O. Long, an independent
historian who has published widely in late medieval and Renaissance
history of science and technology, and intellectual history. Her recent
works includes Obelisk: A History (co-authored with Brian Curran,
Anthony Grafton, and Benjamin Weiss, MIT Press, 2009); and a three
volume edition, translation, and group of studies of a book written by a
fifteenth century oarsman: The Book of Michael of Rhodes: A
Fifteenth-Century Maritime Manuscript (co-edited with David McGee and
Alan Stahl, MIT Press, 2009). She is at work on a cultural history of
engineering in late sixteenth-century Rome.

Before the conference, ACMRS will host a workshop on manuscript studies
to be led by Timothy Graham, Director of the Institute for Medieval
Studies at the University of New Mexico. The workshop will be Thursday
afternoon, February 11, and participation will be limited to 25
participants, who will be determined by the order in which registrations
are received. Email acmrs@asu.edu with \"conference workshop\" as the
subject line to be added to the list. The cost of the workshop is $25
and is in addition to the regular conference registration fee.

The conference registration fee is $95 ($45 for students and emeriti/ae
faculty) and includes welcoming and farewell receptions, two days of
concurrent sessions (Friday and Saturday), and keynote address. Please
note that there will be an opening reception Thursday evening, but there
will be no sessions that day.

The deadline for proposals is 9:00 p.m. Mountain Standard Time on 16
October 2009. Proposals must include audio/visual requirements and any
other special requests. In order to streamline the committee review
process, submissions will only be accepted at
http://link.library.utoronto.ca/acmrs/conference/ from 1 June through 16
October 2009. Questions? Call 480-965-9323 or email acmrs@asu.edu .

Source: http://www.scholares.net/index.php?Entry-20091003185120-_Call_for_Papers_-_Humanity_and_the_Natu...

Gender and the Family, 2010

Gender and the Family: Annual Gender and Medieval Studies Conference

The next annual Gender and Medieval Studies Conference will be held in the Arts Building at the University of Birmingham, 7-10 January 2010. Please see details on the travel page for instructions on the location of the Arts Building.
This conference will examine the functions and representations of the medieval family in a range of contexts, examining how gender roles inform its definition and affect its economy, dynamics, and links to other institutions and networks. 


Despite the current snowy weather across the UK, we are intending to go ahead with the conference as planned. At present there is snow on the ground to a depth of a couple of inches in Birmingham, but roads are open and trains and buses are operating.
If you are coming to speak at the conference, please factor extra time into your travel plans if at all possible. If your journey is delayed, we would be grateful if you could let us know via email to gender.family.2010@googlemail.com This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Photograph of buildings in Birmingham City Centre
 


Source and more... http://medievalgender.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2&Itemid=2